Strategic International Business Management

Order now 14, 2018

International Business Management with a Strategic Approach

Introduction

The success or failure of a business is largely dependent on the quality of its workforce. All successful firms throughout the world seem to be based on improved treatment of new hires and better coordination of operations amongst the workforce. Employees are more likely to enjoy and be motivated to accomplish their jobs when their well-being and the reputation of the workplace as a whole are taken into consideration, as is the case in workplaces where everyone has the opportunity to engage with one another (Burgess 2005, p.325). The management’s noble responsibilities include ensuring that the employees’ active performance and achievements are maintained. Executives, for example, must excel in implementing a preferred leadership style, awarding enthusiastic services to their subjects, and ensuring efficiency in change administration. Likewise, employees must be ready and eager to uphold the ethical standards of the workplace and familiar with the diversity management practices (Burgess 2005, p.330). When it comes to motivating employees in a contemporary workplace, the study has looked at the theories of leadership, motivation, and change management that are applicable to the situation. In the same way, the study broadens our understanding of how to deal with variety, particularly when it comes to a multi-cultural issue. In addition, the study will look at management strategies for fostering professionalism and a sense of ethics.

Leadership as a Means of Boosting Employee Morale

Leaders’ influence on workers is undeniable, and it’s something that can’t be debated. The attitude and morale of the workforce are likely to be defined by the leadership. In a study by Landis, Hill and Harvey (2014), the forceful administrators have a negative effect on individuals who choose a low-profile approach to achieving the greatest possible outcomes for the business. Theories of leadership such as personality, behavioral, and contingency models will be critical in reaching the pinnacle of inspiring people.

Understanding Personality Traits

Leaders’ personalities are seen as instruments for success in the characteristic model. In Latham’s (2015, p.107) opinion, administrators who possess the unique traits of desire, honesty, tenacity, empathy, and self-confidence are likely to succeed in their supervisory roles. As a manager, I would make sure that trust and transparency were prominent in my interactions with my staff. As a way to demonstrate an empathetic approach to employees’ problems, compassion would be highly valued by government officials and the public. The self-assurance characteristic, on the other hand, would have a significant impact on boosting the morale of the workers. In addition, CEOs with respectable demeanors, according to Landis, Hill, and Harvey (2014, p.97), actively go beyond functioning as role models for the juniors. As a result, they have a considerable influence and challenge on the employees’ personal and professional growth, as well as the overall success of the firm.

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The Theory of Human Behaviour

As opposed to depending just on one’s current attributes, the behavioral model helps in selecting the optimal behaviors to take (Olafsen et al., 2015, p.447). Workers are encouraged to work together in teams on the platform. Managers are supposed to enable this to happen. Employee morale will rise as a result of increased cooperation inside the company, as workers will be able to more readily exchange knowledge and skills. By doing so, the members will be more open and trusting of each other and build a natural motivation to perform at their best in all situations. On the other hand, the behavioral theory allows for the inclusive and democratic platform where workforce freely takes part in the decision-making of the business. According to (Olfsen et al., 2015, p.448), the opportunity for the staff to form part of the programs of the establishments bestows certain benefits including feeling involved in the activities of their companies. Also, workers would develop the tendency of exploiting their skills to realize the recognizable output to the organization. Therefore, I would ensure that work coordination is achieved in the various sections of the job setting so as to nurture new employees as well as improving their relations.

The theory of contingency

Contingency models strive to discover workers’ wants and requirements while taking into account the sort of work necessary to achieve organizational objectives (Latham 2014, p.108). The strategy requires a multifaceted approach that includes leadership, assistance, coaching, and transfer of responsibilities to the team. As a manager, I would guarantee that all new hires were given a thorough orientation to the company’s policies and procedures, as well as regular training sessions for current employees. As a result, they’ll have a better understanding of the job’s needs, which will help them become more proficient. In addition, we’d establish a culture of appreciation for the work of the employees by providing them all the tools they need to thrive. For example, the company would dedicate cash to encourage our workers’ research and new discoveries, as well as provide scholarships and offers to select competent employees to further their education to better their abilities.

Motivating Workers with the Help of Psychological Models

What drives individuals to act in a certain way is the focus of motivational theory (Cerasoli, Nicklin, and Ford 2014, p.980). According to the expectation model, people tend to act depending on what they expect to happen at the end. For most individuals, the promise of a raise in income was enough to persuade them to work longer hours (Maruping et al., 2017, p.624). The valence of the reward, the instrumentality of the belief in rewards for completing a certain task, and the expectations that includes the confidence that the input will achieve the intended results are apparently the cornerstones of the expectation platform.

Expectation Theory and Other Workplace Motivation Models

There are always a few radicals in any functional group, who will always question every decision and new activity (Maruping et al., 2017, p.625). Managers, for example, may encounter pushback from certain employees who may intentionally refuse to accept the new tasks since their incentives may not be included in the new program. In order to familiarize employees with creative and compensation strategies, I recommend using them after consulting with them beforehand. We want to boost staff spirits by offering a generous bonus for every extra hour of labor they put in during the event.

Instead, we’d tie financial incentives directly to the company’s particular performance goals, encouraging employees to strive for greater levels of performance. We may, for example, provide cash prizes to the best workers to show our appreciation for their tenacity. Employees’ dedication to the company’s long-term objectives would be strengthened if they received additional incentives outside of money, such as free trips to prestigious locations.

Following the acquired needs theory, we could implement staff development programs and recognition at our company. According to the models, people are more driven when they believe they are superior to others and have a higher position. In addition, the notion reaffirms that employees are always striving for personal, social, or political power in order to feel successful in their jobs. Our employees’ self-esteem and emotions of accomplishment might be bolstered by providing them with mentorship and recognition (Maruping et al., 2017, p. 627). Another factor that might help improve efficiency in a company’s operations is its growth packages, such as a bonus for employees who get to the top ranks.

Hertzberg’s Two Factor Theory’s motivational elements and cleanliness concerns would also be helpful in stimulating the workforce. Hygiene dynamics include salary, business regulations, and perks, as well as the interaction between leaders and coworkers and a safe working environment, according to this concept (Lukwago, Basheka, and Odubuker 2014, p.60). The instigators, on the other hand, are concerned with advancing one’s career and having fun while doing so.

Health, safety, and welfare of our employees would be a top priority in practice. Also, the substantial and reasonable compensation that is in conformity with the changing economy would be attractive to our employees. As a result, we’d develop logical organizational procedures that prioritize our workers’ well-being, such as providing them with paid time off and ensuring that their loved ones get extra attention in the case of illness or death.

How to Motivate Your Employees Using Change Management Theories

Organizational change is inevitable. The Kotte’s 8-model seems essential in achieving worker motivation when deciding to implement new alterations in our firm. To begin, the notion suggests that administrators should take proactive measures to raise awareness of the need for change (Ng and Kee 2013, p.42). Employees, as well as other important stakeholders, must be convinced that the strategy is something they can be a part of by conducting an open caucus. As a reaction, I would graphically describe the potential and hazards of our firm’s overreliance on the current procedures to our employees. It’s critical to guide new recruits while also keeping an eye out for potential detours. Kotter claims that at least 75% of the internal participants-the employees-support the effective improvements.

Second, I’d put together a strong coalition to push for the recommended reforms. As a point of reference, we would choose the finest departmental heads, as well as external stakeholders who are likely to implement the changes. With the help of compelling leaders, the workers would be compelled to concentrate on the new variants with all their might (Bastedo, Samuels, and Kleinman 2014, p.397). When it comes to motivating the team and changing their mindsets, Kotter says that managers should have a mix of diverse departmental heads with a variety of skills.

Third, we’d sketch up a plan for how things should be different. According to Kotte, the perfect dream gives every employee the capacity to do their job to their full potential (Hornstein 2015, p.292). Employees will be inspired if the reasons for bringing change and the tactics for implementing them are explained to them in detail. Everyone, it was said, will have their grievances handled and strive tirelessly to achieve the suggested objectives.

Recruits are also motivated by a clear picture of the company’s long-term goals. It is Kotte’s opinion that managers should have regular and non-biased discussions aimed at sustaining the supposedly changed behaviors inside their organizations. A contemporary manager would ensure that the heads of the departments and the change agents attend a series of meetings with everyone in the company to make sure everyone is aware of the new plans. In addition, we’d start a platform for public discussion. that offers the open and honest solution to the employee’s grievances and concerns.

Next, we would shift much effort in removing the obstacles to changes. Kotte assures managers to establish structures that foster modifications while periodically monitoring and removing the barriers for the variations (Hornstein 2015, p.293). To achieve the practice, we would identify the The theory of contingency is known as

Contingency models strive to discover workers’ wants and requirements while taking into account the kind of activities necessary to achieve organizational objectives (Latham 2014, p.108). Approaches such as these need a multifaceted strategy that includes everything from providing leadership and guidance to providing assistance and coaching as well as delegating tasks to employees. It is my responsibility as a manager to provide pre-work training for new hires and on-the-job training for current employees so they are aware of the company’s policies and procedures. Specifically, the inclination would provide them a working knowledge of the job’s needs, which would help them improve their skills. Introducing a culture of support that rewards employees’ efforts by providing the tools they need to succeed is also something we want to do. For example, the company would devote cash to encourage our workers’ research and new discoveries, as well as provide scholarships and offers to select competent employees to extend their education in order to better their talents.

The Use of Motivation Theories to Motivate Workers

Motivation theory aims to provide light on what motivates individuals to act in a certain way (Cerasoli, Nicklin, and Ford 2014, p.980). The expectation model, for example, suggests that people make decisions depending on what they expect to happen at the end. Following the promise of a raise in salary, workers were more than happy to work longer hours (Maruping et al., 2017, p.624). To put it another way, the foundations of an expectation platform appear to include a valence, which includes the reward’s value, an instrumentality, which conveys a belief in rewards for completing a specific task, and an expectancy, which includes the belief that an input will achieve its desired results as a result of the experience.

Methods for Improving Productivity at Work: Using Expectation Theory

Despite the best efforts of the majority, there are always a few “radicals” in every workplace (Maruping et al., 2017, p.625). Managers, for example, may encounter pushback from certain employees who may intentionally refuse to accept the new positions since their incentives may not be included in the new program. As a consequence, I recommend that creative and compensation methods be used after dialogue with the employees to familiarize them with them. In order to boost staff morale, we plan to pay a sizable sum of money to those who contribute extra time during the event.

A better approach is to integrate the financial incentives directly into the company’s unique performance goals. In order to show our appreciation for their tenacity, we could provide cash prizes to the top achievers. In addition to monetary rewards, employees would be more motivated to perform with a greater level of enthusiasm if they received non-cash rewards like free trips to select locations.

The acquired needs theory predicts that our company’s adoption of staff training and recognition will be a success. Models show that people are more driven when they believe they are superior to others and have a greater sense of power. In addition, the notion reaffirms that employees are always striving for personal, social, or political power. Mentoring and recognizing employees would seem to provide a platform for improving employee self-esteem and fostering a sense of accomplishment (Maruping et al., 2017, p. 627). Growth packages such as the permission for promoting high-performing employees into higher positions would also encourage a fierce rivalry for excellence, which would result in an increase in operational efficiency.

Motivating elements and cleanliness concerns from Hertzberg’s Two Factor Theory may help get the staff fired up. Hygiene dynamics include salary, business regulations, and perks, as well as the interaction between leaders and coworkers and a safe working environment, according to this concept (Lukwago, Basheka, and Odubuker 2014, p.60). However, the instigators are concerned with advancing in one’s job as well as how much one enjoys doing the duties.

In practice, we would guarantee that the health, safety, and well-being of our employees are protected. Additionally, our employees will appreciate the substantial and reasonable compensation that is in line with the changing economy. Our workers’ well-being is also a priority, therefore we’d implement reasonable organizational procedures like providing them with pay relief and giving them extra attention in the case of illness or death among their family members.

The Theories of Change Management and their Application in the Motivation of Workers

As a business grows, so does the need for change. Even if we may decide to implement the new changes at our company, the Kotte’s 8-model seems critical to achieving employee motivation. It is suggested that administrators begin by establishing a sense of urgency for undergoing the shift (Ng and Kee 2013, p.42). In order to make important stakeholders, such as employees, feel a part of the strategy, an open caucus is held. In response, I would graphically communicate the potential and hazards associated with new endeavors and overreliance on current processes by our business to our employees. Maintaining control of the newcomers while keeping an eye out for any problems is critical. It is said that at least 75% of internal participants must approve the changes in order for them to be effective.

A formidable coalition to lead the planned reforms would be formed by me, as well. Not only that, we’d look for the finest department heads and external stakeholders who are likely to implement the changes. Front-runners that are charismatic would have a huge impact on the workforce’s motivation to concentrate on the new versions (Bastedo, Samuels, and Kleinman 2014, p.397). When it comes to motivating the team and changing their mindsets, Kotter says that managers should have a mix of diverse departmental heads with varying levels of expertise.

Creating a clear picture of the future is the third step. Every employee is equipped to perform to their potential because to Kotte’s faultless dream, which he describes in detail in his book (Hornstein 2015, p.292). In order to inspire the workforce, it is necessary to explain to them why the changes are necessary and how they will be implemented to them. Dissatisfaction with the planned projects was supposedly resolved, and everyone will strive tirelessly to achieve them.

In addition, the ability to communicate the company’s goal is crucial in energizing new hires. To reinforce the supposed improvements, Kotte advises managers to engage in regular, open, and non-biased talks. A contemporary manager would guarantee that the heads of the departments and the change agents attend a series of meetings with everyone in the company to make sure that everyone understands the new plans. We’d also create a platform for it. (Saleem 2017, p.345). Besides developing the moralities, acknowledgment gives a platform for the professionalism development since the personnel usually concentrate on doing the best to earn indebtedness, thus appearing ever motivated with the business.

Conclusion

Overall, motivating employees is a critical task that requires keenness, professionalism, and patience since there is variability of people with different competencies and level of learning. The leadership theories that relevantly apply to the worker’s management include, trait, behavioral, and contingency models. On the other hand, the motivation platforms like the expectation define the level of monetary and non-fiscal assets that assist in boosting the morale of the recruits. Similarly, Hertzberg’s Two Factor Theory outlines the rewards that managers would use to retain the staff. As well, the Kotter’s 8-step model explains how the administrators can manage the changes while maintaining contact with the personnel and their morale.

Additionally, the study has used Taylor Cox, and Nancy Adler’s model to explain the diversity is running in the workplace. Notably, promotion of ethics and professionalism calls for the prioritization of the hierarchical needs of the workers, improved communication techniques, and a better understanding of the job challenges. Additionally, it requires collaboration amongst the staff members, and full acknowledgment of the merits that are achieved by the workforce, either in a group or individually. Therefore, managers should be very cautious in studying the requirements of every operative and show commitment in achieving their needs. Besides, they should encourage the development of good positive culture and good working conditions and environment that will contain their subjects to have the long-term contract with the establishment alongside improving significantly to increase the efficiency.

References

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Burgess, D., 2005. What motivates employees to transfer knowledge outside their work unit?. The Journal of Business Communication (1973), 42(4), 324-348.

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Cerasoli, C.P., Nicklin, J.M., and Ford, M.T., 2014. Intrinsic motivation and extrinsic incentives jointly predict performance: A 40-year meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 140(4), 980.

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Landis, E.A., Hill, D., and Harvey, M.R., 2014. A synthesis of leadership theories and styles. Journal of Management Policy and Practice, 15(2), 97.

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Lukwago, G., Basheka, B., and Odubuker, D.E.P., 2014. Using Herzberg’s two factor theory to develop a construct validity for motivation of employees in Uganda’s National Agricultural Research Organisation (NARO): a preliminary analysis. Global Journal of Commerce & Management Perspective, 3(3), 59-65.

Maruping, L.M., Bala, H., Venkatesh, V. and Brown, S.A., 2017. Going beyond intention: Integrating behavioral expectation into the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 68(3), 623-637.

Mawere, M., Mubaya, T.R., van Reisen, M.E.H. and Stam, G.V., 2016. Maslow’s Theory of Human Motivation and its Deep Roots in Individualism: Interrogating Maslow’s Applicability in Africa. In: Theory, Knowledge, Development and Politics: What Role for the Academy in the Sustainability of Africa? Langaa RPCIG.

Ng, H.S., and Kee, D.M.H., 2013. Organisational Culture can be a Double-edged Sword for Firm Performance. Research Journal of Business Management, 7(1), 41-52.

Olafsen, A.H., Halvari, H., Forest, J. and Deci, E.L., 2015. Show them the money? The role of pay, managerial need support, and justice in a self‐determination theory model of intrinsic work motivation. Scandinavian journal of psychology, 56(4), 447-457.

Saleem, A., 2017. Erudition Through Maslow’s Theory with the perspective of Humanism. International Journal of Innovative Knowledge Concepts

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